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Wolfinger's Stunning Christopher Reeve Superman Portrait Debuts in the CBR Speakeasy

Last year, CBR opened the doors of its Hollywood-based Speakeasy offices. Among the features of the new space was a special portrait of Adam West as Batman, painted by artist Terry Wolfinger and commissioned by Executive Producer Jonah Weiland for the Speakeasy's walls.

Today, CBR unveils its latest Wolfinger commission: A painting of Christopher Reeve in his iconic role of Superman.

Superstar comic book writer and lifelong Superman fan Mark Waid explains why this new piece of art is a fitting tribute to the legacy of the Man of Steel, and to the man who brought him to life, creating millions of fans in the process.

When Jonah Weiland told me he was commissioning portraits of some of comics culture's superstars to decorate the CBR Speakeasy, I was intrigued. I'd seen artist Terry Wolfinger's work before, and I'm a fan. Now, I'm not just intrigued, I'm living in eager anticipation -- because when Jonah sent me an advance peek at this painting, it nearly took my breath away.

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Wolfinger so beautifully captured so many nuances to my all-time favorite Superman, Christopher Reeve -- the man most responsible for my love of the Man of Steel and, probably, the career that love launched -- that they're well worth unpacking for study. Take a good look.

The detail is uncanny and photographic, but a great portrait doesn't serve merely as an imitation of a snapshot; its brush strokes use technique to reveal something new about its subject. And what I love about this painting, what it conveys, is an intensity you're not going to find in any publicity still. This isn't toothy-grin, harmless Superman (though there is the tiniest hint of a smile). This Superman is all business, purposeful without foregoing the gentility that Reeve brought to the role. I look at the man in this painting and I just want to apologize to him for whatever I did that earned that "don't let me down again" expression. - Mark Waid

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