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Go Go Power Rangers: Forever Rangers #1 Is Oddly Paced, But Satisfying

BOOM! Studios comic book reimagining of Saban's iconic Mighty Morphin Power Rangers continues in Go Go Power Rangers: Forever Rangers #1, an oversized special dealing with the immediate fallout of a betrayal facing the team. Written by Ryan Parrott and illustrated by Eleonora Carlini and Francesco Mortarino, the one-shot hits the ground running following the events of the main series, serving as a culmination for previous readers but not entirely accessible to those picking up the special, with its new number one indicating a fresh jumping on point.

Picking up from the recently concluded Go Go Power Rangers comic series by Parrott and Carlini, the team faces the wrath of Alpha, who betrayed them and Zordon, leaving the Rangers at the mercy of Goldar. Upon confronting their longtime companion turned foe, the special jumps several weeks ahead to revisit the team as they move on with their personal lives, exploring how each Ranger has approached their high school lives with all the requisite interpersonal drama and readjusted dynamics.

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In a way, the special feels like an anticlimactic finish to the comic book series, resolving the main conflict with breakneck speed in the opening, with the second half of the issue falling back into the Rangers during their individual civilian lives while potentially setting up future stories. Parrott has always had a strong handle on the various voices of the classic Power Rangers characters which is particularly apparent when the teens settle back into life at Angel Grove High. Each of the original team members get their own moment to shine, from Jason and Trini examining their romantic relationship to Zack having to deal with the fallout of directly disobeying Zordon's orders. With the potential exception of Billy, no character is really shortchanged in the special.

Similarly, Carlini, with returning inker Simona Di Gianfelice and colorist Raúl Angulo, boost the issue with warm artwork; instantly recognizable as the classic characters without feeling dated, like a product of the 90s when the franchise first debuted. To handle with the increased page count, however, penciler Francesco Mortarino and colorist Katherine Lobo join in for a significant portion of the issue. The art team's contributions work well with the fan-favorite franchise but are markedly different from the main series' team, making the shift potentially jarring to some readers as there's little discernible rationale behind the transition. The sudden change-up can throw off the visual flow for some but, ultimately, is more distracting than necessary. Mortarino and Lobo both still deliver, their contributions just aren't particularly seamless.

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For fans of Go Go Power Rangers, this special is a must-read, serving as a culmination to the conflict and all the relationships within the previous series. The fact that it is delivered as an oversized, rebranded special and not a direct continuation is a puzzling one, as it picks up directly from the cliffhanger ending of the main series' final issue, not making it especially accessible. And with the vast majority of its signature Sentai action loaded in the front, the pacing may be off for some fans of the franchise.

Saban's Go Go Power Rangers: Forever Rangers #1 is the true conclusion to Parrott and Carlini's main comic book series, resolving the conflict while presenting a resolution of sorts for its cast of protagonists. Oddly paced with its primary action at the beginning before largely settling into a denouement for its second half, the issue provides a look at the classic characters in their civilian lives before potentially setting the stage for new adventures. Carlini and Mortarino each deliver fantastic visuals though the transition is oddly defined between the two, affecting the tone. With BOOM! Studios continuing to revisit the original incarnation of the team, the special leaves plenty of threads for future stories to explore.

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