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REVIEW: Mile 22 is an Exhausting Splatter Fest Pretending to be a Thriller

Obviously, the entire operation goes south immediately in what winds up being a multilayered tale of double and triple crossing and revenge. Or, well, what thinks it's a tale of double and triple crossing and revenge, but is actually just an incomprehensible mess. Every plot point in Mile 22 is punctuated by absolutely brutal, overwhelming hyper violence -- bone crunching, blood splattering, close quarters blood and gore that never really relents or lets up.

There are two, back to back Boromir-style last stand moments that involve members of the team valiantly sacrificing themselves in a hail of guts and glory. Children and civilians become concerns when and if they're able to really up the threat of bloodshed and showy trauma. Every fight is drawn out to the very last possible minute to ensure the maximum amount of carnage.

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REVIEW: The Darkest Minds Is a Violent, Predictable Patchwork of Better Movies

All the while, Overwatch looks on trying to make sense of the chaos with John Malkovich, eerily calm and collected, offering up trite monologues about things like how every now and again a man has to succumb to the urge to "spit in his hand, raise the black flag" and go down while racking up a body count. Meanwhile, Wahlberg's Silva exists like a sort of blood soaked, gun toting Sherlock Holmes or House, MD -- always the smartest person in this, and every room, and always the first to show it. It's an ironic character trait to lean into, especially considering that if Mile 22 is about anything, it's about Silva's team outright failing to do their jobs.

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On the technical side, things are even messier. The film is cut together as three consecutive stories, interwoven with one another. There's the present day and the operation itself, there's the shady Russian operation running tangentially to everything, and there's Silva in the future giving the debrief about just what went wrong. These three stories overlap and skip between one another seemingly at random -- and though the intent is obviously to build out the mystery of just what's going on, the actual effect is to create so much tedious confusion that it hardly seems worth the effort to sort it all out. If the nonstop reign of skull crushing, eye gouging ultra violence isn't enough to exhaust you entirely, trying to keep track of what's important and why definitely will.

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Sebastian Stan Addresses Taking Over Captain America Role
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