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The Past Will Not Be Ignored With The Deathbringer Prophecy

This is "Went to Tell Everybody," where I spotlighted different cool independent comic book series based on submissions from the indie comic book creators themselves via a set Q & A with the creators themselves. Essentially, the creators speak for their own work and "Went to Tell Everybody" will give them a place to do so!

This is a ostensibly an ongoing weekly feature, so if you would like to see your work spotlighted, as well, there's no time limit or anything like that. So you can submit at any time. It's not a first come/first serve thing, ya know? However, sending your comic in isn't a guarantee that I'll run a spotlight on it. I'm not gonna just promote anything on here, ya know? So if we go a while without an edition of this feature, it is because I don't have something that I'm okay with putting my name on a spotlight of it. Click here for the current submission guidelines.

Today we look at the supernatural superhero story, The Deathbringer Prophecy from longtime The Line it is Drawn artist, Gene Guilmette and writer Rich Andrebou.

The book is available at Comixology here or you can purchase a print copy of the book at IndyPlanet here.

What is your comic about?

The Deathbringer Prophecy is a supernatural superhero story that follows Arik, a young gay man who lives with his boyfriend Leo in San Francisco. Five years ago, Arik moved to the city by the bay to find his own path and forget the past. But one day he is attacked by a malevolent force and put in the hospital. Time has run out and no one is safe.

What made you choose the comic medium for this story?

I’ve loved comics since I was knee-high to a grasshopper. I was always telling stories about my paintings and drawings as a kid and saying that the art was just a small part of the larger story. I finally got serious about making comics in 2009 after losing my day job at the time and was looking for a comic book project to collaborate on. I really liked Rich’s story and wanted to do as much of a traditional comic book approach as possible.

What aspect of your comic are you the most proud of?

That I got it done! Seriously, as an indie creator you have do the work whenever you can, around your day job schedule, home obligations and life in general. There were long stretches where I didn’t think it was going to be finished but I wasn’t going to give up. This is my first collaborative effort and I wanted to see that finished book on the table. My favorite parts of the book art wise I would have to say are the two-page spreads, especially the one outside the castle.

What’s the one piece of philosophy and/or advice that has informed your comic book work the most?

Don’t be satisfied, ever. As an artist, keep looking for new ways to do your craft, there is always something new to try. Allow yourself to make mistakes and learn from them. Take criticism with a grain of salt but pay attention to and respect those that have gone before you who and are willing to offer their advice. And above all, have fun!

Since this is “Went to Tell Everybody,” tell everybody about another current comic book series that you would like other people to know more about.

Check out Crescent City Monsters written by Newton Lilavois and art by Gian Carlo Bernal.

It is an amazing neo-noir story about Jonas a blues musician, who is also a sorcerer in 1963, New Orleans. One night someone in that supernatural world puts a bounty out on Jonas. As Jonas tries to figure out who put a bounty on his head and why, the monsters of New Orleans are out to capture him, dead or alive.

Also Elizabeth Beier’s The Big Book of Bisexual Trials and Errors

Elizabeth Beier chronicles her true-life romantic tales as she breaks up with a long-term boyfriend and starts to date women. Beier tackles the complexities of sexuality and self image with a conversational and immediate art style, telling stories anyone who's ever struggled with dating can relate to.

Again, if you're interested in The Deathbringer Prophecy, it is available at Comixology here or you can purchase a print copy of the book at IndyPlanet here.

And of course, once again, if you're interested in seeing YOUR independent comic book spotlighted in this feature, click here for the current submission guidelines.

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