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DC's Male Superheroes Used To Really Discourage Female Superheroes

In Drawing Crazy Patterns, I spotlight at least five scenes/moments from within comic book stories that fit under a specific theme (basically, stuff that happens frequently in comics). Note that these lists are inherently not exhaustive. They are a list of five examples (occasionally I'll be nice and toss in a sixth). So no instance is "missing" if it is not listed. It's just not one of the five examples that I chose.

Today, based on a suggestion from reader Dylan C., we look at DC Comics' odd history of their male superheroes being really dismissive of new female superheroes popping up.

First up is a comic book that I have written about in the past (in fact, it was that article that inspired Dylan to make this suggestion) In 1950's Star-Spangled Comics #103 (by David V. Reed and Jim Mooney), one of Dick Grayson's classmates who is playing Juliet to his Romeo in the school play decides that she would much rather be hooked up with Robin, so she decides to become a superhero of her own....

Robins keeps trying to ditch her, but she stows away in the trunk of the Batmobile (I like that Robin just drives the Batmobile by himself) and he ends up teaming up with her while Batman is gone...

However, Mary makes a slip up and Robin is able to figure out her secret identity. He theorizes that if he could figure it out, so could the criminal underworld, so he sabotages her the next time they are out in public to force her to retire...

I mean, I sort of get where he's coming from, but it still seems super messed up, right?

In 1952's Adventure Comics #181 (by Paul Norris and an unknown writer), a young woman accidentally comes across Johnny Quick's magic speed formula and becomes his partner in crime-fighting...

Johnny doesn't want her around, so when she forgets the formula, he gives her a fake one and lets her believe that the power just wore off...

Such a jerk!

In 1956's Detective Comics #233 (by Edmond Hamilton, Sheldon Moldoff and Stan Kaye), Batwoman debuts and Batman right away is to cry about how unfair it is for her to be there, "But no! Only I can dress like a Bat in Gotham! Waaaah!"

He then vows to uncover her secret identity to make her stop being a superhero...

He succeeds and she agrees to stop...

Luckily, everyone knew she was so awesome that she was back to fighting crime in no time!

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