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DC Comics Honors the Life of Stan 'The Man' Lee

The comic book sphere and, in fact, the world of pop culture as a whole has been utterly rocked by the news that legendary Marvel Comics writer, Editor-in-Chief, publisher and chairman Stan Lee has passed away at the age of 95.

What followed was an outpouring of emotion on social media, in which fans and creators alike celebrated the life of the recently-departed comic book icon. As a testament to just how beloved and influential Lee was, even his greatest competition felt compelled to honor the legacy he left behind.

RELATED: Watch Kevin Smith Lead a Cheer For Stan Lee At LA Comic Con

The official DC Comics Twitter page posted a eulogical tweet celebrating Lee's life, reading, "He changed the way we look at heroes, and modern comics will always bear his indelible mark. His infectious enthusiasm reminded us why we all fell in love with these stories in the first place. Excelsior, Stan."

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Marvel and DC have a long history of battling it out for superhero dominance, both on and off the page. However, despite just how synonymous Stan Lee was with Marvel, his relationship with DC was actually a rather healthy one, all things considered.

In the early 2000s, Lee penned DC Comics' Just Imagine series, in which the legendary Marvel figure reimagined some of DC's most popular heroes in his own image, giving a unique take on the likes of Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman and Green Lantern, among others.

RELATED: What Was Stan Lee's First Cameo?

In addition to the countless appearances he has made in Marvel films, Lee also even made a very self-aware cameo in the 2018 DC animated film Teen Titans Go! To the Movies.

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It just goes to show that while Marvel and DC may be "rivals," the fact remains that certain creators are simply so iconic that they break such barriers, earning respect and praise from every possible direction. Stan Lee was undeniably one of those creators.

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