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DC Expands Black Label Wave One Releases with More Classic Collections

Hot on the heels of Sean Gordon Murphy's Batman: White Knight joining, DC Comics' Black Label will be getting even more classic, with some highly-popular comic collections from the past added to this new imprint.

DC revealed the books that will be added are Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely’s All-Star Superman, Darwyn Cooke’s DC: The New Frontier, Mark Waid and Alex Ross’ Kingdom Come, and Frank Miller's Batman: Year One and Dark Knight: Master Race.

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The Black Label line is geared towards more subverted, adult and well, unconventional stories, so it makes sense why these Elseworld-esque tales would fit there. It was previously announced that Superman: Year One (Miller, John Romita Jr.) and The Other History of the DC Universe (by Oscar-winning writer John Ridley) would lead the line.

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Other titles include Wonder Woman Historia: The Amazons from Kelly Sue DeConnick and Phil Jimenez, a three-book series that spans “from the creation of the Amazons to the moment Steve Trevor washes up on the shores of Paradise Island.” Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo, fresh from even series Dark Nights: Metal, will re-team for Batman: Last Knight on Earth, taking place in a “strange future, villains are triumphant and society has liberated itself from the burden of ethical codes.” Snyder first discussed the series last October at New York Comic Con, with Batman: White Knight's Sean G. Murphy attached as artist at the time.

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The Joker team of Brian Azzarello and Lee Bermejo will reunite for Batman: Damned, featuring a team-up between Batman and John Constantine, following the Joker’s apparent death. Writer Greg Rucka will return to Wonder Woman for Wonder Woman: Diana’s Daughter (working title), which tells the story of “a young woman seeks to reclaim what has been forgotten” in a hopeless world.

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