Ultimate Spider-Man arrested in scuffle with NYPD

by  in Comic News Comment
Ultimate Spider-Man arrested in scuffle with NYPD

With a front page that rivals anything J. Jonah Jameson has published, the New York Post trumpeted the news Sunday that Spider-Man struck a police officer in the face during an altercation in Times Square. Or, if you prefer “Times Square rampage.”

Interestingly, after countless crimes (allegedly, in some cases) committed in the past couple of years by guys dressed as the Peter Parker-variety Spider-Man — groping a woman, punching a tourist, robbing convenience stores, fighting two Captains America, etc. — this may be the first that involves someone dressed as Miles Morales/Ultimate Spider-Man.

Perhaps more interesting — and certainly more amusing — is that the New York Police Department referred the suspect, 25-year-old Junior Bishop of Brooklyn, as “Spider-Man” throughout its press release. Also: The incident was caught on video, which you can watch below. (Note: It contains profanity.)

According to The Associated Press, a police officer confronted the webslinger Saturday afternoon after overhearing him demand at least $5 from a woman a posed for a photo with, instead of the $1 tip she’d offered. When the officer told Bishop that he couldn’t require payment, the wall-crawler responded by cursing and telling the cop to mind his business.

When Bishop couldn’t produce an ID upon request, the officer moved to arrest him. That’s when things got spider-crazy, with Bishop allegedly punching the unidentified cop in the face as they wrestled to the pavement. Another officer help subdue Spider-Man as other patrolmen arrived.

Here’s my favorite sentence about the confrontation, courtesy of the Post:

A crowd of fellow mascots, including Elmo, Batman and a side-by-side Mickey and Minnie Mouse, also stood watch, their fuzzy mitts held to their giant heads in apparent disbelief.

The injured offer was treated for a cut and swollen eye. Spider-Man was charged with assaulting an officer, resisting arrest and criminal mischief.

This is only the latest incident involving costumed characters in Times Square, where Tim Tompkins, president of the Times Square Alliance, has called for regulation. New York City Council is considering a bill that would require licenses and background checks for costumed performers. However, The AP notes its final approval has been delayed because copyright issues surrounding the costumes.