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Top 50 Comic Book Artists #35-31

by  in Comic News Comment

Here are the next five artists that you voted as your favorites of all-time based on over one thousand ballots cast! Click here to see the writers #35-31 on the countdown. Click here to see a master list of all artists listed so far.

New format! The comprehensive career retrospective was taking way too long (and for some of these people, it was getting nuts detailing their decades long career in comics), so now for each writer and artist, I’ll detail “Five Notable Works” by them.

35 Steve McNiven – 291 points (4 first place votes)

Steve McNiven first came to prominence working at CrossGen on Meridian…


By the time he left CrossGen, McNiven was already a hot talent. He began working for Marvel on a new Fantastic Four series, Marvel Knights: 4…


After a prominent stint on New Avengers, McNiven took on his biggest assignment to date, drawing the massively popular Marvel crossover Civil War, with writer Mark Millar…


He reunited with Millar to do a stint on Wolverine, telling stories set in the future called “Old Man Logan”…


Currently, McNiven and Millar are working on their creator-owned title for Marvel’s ICON line, Nemesis…


Here is a sample McNiven page…


34 Barry Windsor-Smith – 294 points (3 first place votes)

After getting his start working on short stories in British versions of Marvel Comics, Barry Windsor-Smith soon began working for Marvel Comics proper during the late 1960s.

However, it was a brand new comic, Conan the Barbarian, working with Roy Thomas adapting Robert E. Howard’s Conan character, that made Windsor-Smith a star…


He worked on Conan in various capacities for a number of years (plus other assignments for Marvel) before he pulled back from mainstream comics for a number of years, choosing to do comics on his own terms.

He came back to Marvel in the 1980s to work on a few assignments, most famously a few special issues of Uncanny X-Men with writer Chris Claremont…


In the early 1990s, Windsor-Smith wrote and drew the most definitive origin for Wolverine yet, Weapon X, in the pages of Marvel Comics Presents…


He was soon hired by Valiant Comics to be their chief designer (he also wrote and drew a number of comics for Valiant)….


By the time Windsor-Smith parted ways with Valiant, they were a massive success.

After leaving Valiant, he did a series for the Ultraverse as well as a notable comic anthology for Dark Horse called Barry Windsor-Smith: Storyteller…


For the last decade or so, Windsor-Smith has been working on an epic story called Monsters. From what we’ve been shown so far, it looks magnificent.

Here is a sample Windsor-Smith page…


33 Jim Aparo – 298 points (4 first place votes)

It seems hard to believe, but Jim Aparo had a hard time breaking into the comic business. He actually ended up working in advertising throughout his 20s and into his 30s before he got a break at Charlton Comics. He soon became one of their most prolific artists, and when Charlton’s Dick Giordano moved to DC, he brought Aparo along with him, debuting on Aquaman for DC…


He soon began a looong and famous run on Brave and the Bold with writer Bob Haney…


During this time, Aparo also became a notable fill-in artist on ALL of the Batman titles. Aparo had the distinction of not only being good, but also of being FAST.

During the 1970s, he drew an acclaimed (if controversial) run on Spectre with writer Michael Fleisher…


During the 1980s, after the Brave and the Bold ended, Aparo drew the spin-off of the canceled title, Batman and the Outsiders, with Aparo co-creating a number of characters with the book’s writer, Mike Bar…


Aparo continued to work for DC (especially on Batman titles) well into the 1990s and early 2000s…


Aparo passed away in 2005.

Here is a sample Aparo page…


32 Moebius – 305 points (10 first place votes)

Jean Giraud was in his early 20s when he began to work with writer Jean-Michel Charlier on the western comic book Fort Navajo. The character of Lieutenant Blueberry became so popular that he eventually spun off into his own magazine…


Moebius was the name Giraud took for his comic book work having to do with science fiction and fantasy, and those ended up becoming perhaps his most well-known works (although Blueberry is still pretty darn famous).

During the 1980s, Marvel (through their Epic line) reprinted translated versions of pretty much all of Moebius’ most classic works, and that’s what I’ll be presenting here.

First, with writer Alejandro Jodorowsky, the Incal series…


plus Moebius’ most notable works as writer/artist – Arzach…


and the Airtight Garage…


Plus, in 1988, Moebius did a famous Silver Surfer one-shot with Stan Lee, titled Parable…


Here is a sample Moebius page…


31 Gene Colan – 335 points (4 first place votes)

Gene Colan began working in comics in the late 1940s and worked steadily for Timely and DC Comics for the next decade plus, always doing solid work, but not the distinctive work that he is known for now.

It was not until he began working for Marvel again (having left Timely when it was Atlas Comics and the company nearly went out of business) in the mid-1960s that his sense of style was fully appreciated.


While working on Iron Man in Tales of Suspense (Colan’s first Silver Age stories for Marvel were Sub-Mariner ones in Tales to Astonish), Colan became the regular artist on Daredevil, a gig he would hold on to for a number of years, through a variety of writers on the title…


Along with writer Marv Wolfman and inker Tom Palmer, Colan worked on Tomb of Dracula for a number of years…


During this time, he also drew Howard the Duck for Marvel…


In the 1980s, after a split from Marvel, Colan went to work for DC, becoming the regular Batman artist for awhile and co-creating Night Force with Wolfman…


Colan has worked for a number of different companies since the 1990s, including going back to Marvel for another stint on Daredevil.

He recently won an Eisner Award with writer Ed Brubaker for “Best Single Issue” for a 2009 issue of Captain America.

Here is a sample Colan page…


As a general note, do not use the comments here to bash creators. It seems that a lot of posters need to tone their rhetoric down about 150 notches. If you think a creator is too high or too low, feel free to say it, but just keep it civil.