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Superman Family Adventures #8

by  in Comic Reviews Comment
Superman Family Adventures #8

In “Superman Family Adventures” #8, Superman learns a little more about his past and the Super Pets encounter a new foe disguised as a friend thanks to the creative minds of Franco Aureliani and Art Baltazar. The issue opens with a peek into the daily activities of Superboy and Supergirl as they learn what it means to be Kryptonian on Earth. Right away, Baltazar and Aureliani unleash madcap fun, giving readers of all ages teases and cameos designed to delight.

Baltazar’s deceptively simple style is engaging and contagious, giving rationale and life to even the most ridiculous situations. Truly playing to all ages, Baltazar and Aureliani include scenes where Krypto, Streaky and Fuzzy drive the narrative. Like the greatest Saturday morning cartoons, the human characters only hear the expected noises from the Super Pets, but the reader knows what is really going on.

That spirit of fun pervades every panel of this comic, including the revelation that purple and green are “evil colors” as declared by Superman himself. That fun engulfs Baltazar’s interpretation of the alien foes from the early issues of the George Perez/Nicola Scott/Jesus Merino New 52 “Superman,” but in a compact, digestible manner. There are a few panels of the fire, ice and lizard characters fighting the Superman family, but a resolution is achieved within the confines of “Superman Family Adventures” #8.

“Superman Family Adventures” has regularly been a treat; especially in the context of a DC Universe with multiple incarnations of the Man of Steel that just don’t quite feel “super” enough. Aureliani and Baltazar share enthusiasm and reverence for Superman and his supporting cast, and that comes through quite nicely. “Superman Family Adventures” #8 is a great sample of what to expect from this book and also makes for a snazzy introduction to one of the comic book industry’s — and even America’s — icons. Yes, younger readers will certainly find greater enjoyment in this story, but the young at heart will be almost equally rewarded by this issue.