Sunday Brunch: 8/22/10

by  in Comic News Comment
Sunday Brunch: 8/22/10

The comics internet in a nutshell. Gird your loins!

ITEM! Matt Seneca, quickly becoming my new new favorite non-Abhay comics critic, internet category, writes about his favorite Superman story:

If there was only one Superman comic, it would be this one, which takes up every aspect of the grand tapestry that is Superman, strips it down to the essentials, and feeds it through the hands of the best artist ever to draw the character. It’s an entire universe in one go, an artifact that distills the power of all the thousand other Superman stories into a surging core.

He’s not talking about All Star Superman! Ha! I totally got you.

ITEM! J. Caleb Mozzocco does my solicit statistic thing so that I don’t have to! Twenty Batman or Batman-related titles in November. Eleven comics with the word “Avengers” in the title. Nine Thor books. (Not pictured: Forty-seven Green Hornet comics, one Atomic Robo issue.)

ITEM! Todd Alcott finishes off his analyses of Batman films with the best of them all, The Dark Knight. It’s great reading:

When folks complain that Two-Face isn’t in the movie enough, I think what they mean is that the cool special-effects makeup isn’t in the movie enough, and that Two-Face doesn’t have any kind of outlandish, colorful scheme to implement. Well, that’s too bad, but the Joker doesn’t have a scheme either. There isn’t any “end” to this for the Joker, he wants to take the whole world and send it down the toilet — an endless project of disorder to match Bruce’s endless project of order. Whereas Two-Face has the opposite of a grand scheme — he wants to kill the people who made him suffer, and then kill himself. The folks who pine for a “bigger” Two-Face story, one to match the one in, say, Batman Forever I guess, where he teams up with the Riddler to build a giant mind-control ray, miss the great tragedy at the heart of The Dark Knight — they want a supervillain, whereas the Nolans have imagined him as a human being.

OBLIGATORY SIMS THE RESTRAINING ORDER ARRIVED ON THURSDAY DEPT: Chris Sims reads Tarot so that the world doesn’t have to. What a man:

For the record, Vera’s breasts aren’t merely convenient handles, they’re actually a cunning trap: Her black vinyl bra and fishnet bodice are actually wired with enough electricity to kill the two werewolves, while leaving her more or less unharmed. Which… Okay, look, I know this is a book about witches and ghosts and werewolves and that’s fine, but I’m pretty sure that an sending a hundred thousand volts through one’s own electric bra would probably be a phenomenally bad idea. Just sayin’. But then, that’s what they’re there for.

And hey, that quote doesn’t even mention the naked werewolf ladies.

ALSO AT COMICSALLIANCE, we’ve got the Lets Be Friends Again guys navigating the murky waters of Aquaman continuity, a labyrinth no man can survive:

ITEM! Webcomics wizard John Campbell done had an art show:

ITEM! Tim Hodler of Comics Comics returns to the idea of auteur theory and how it fits in the world world of comics comics:

In the conventional cinematic version of the argument, you’d have to say that the artist (“because the visual, the image, will always predominate”) is the auteur, and in fact, in fannish opinion (if not more mainstream reporting), fairly or not, Kirby and Ditko tend to get the lions’ share of credit for their collaborations with Stan Lee. (There is no room to get into the complicated arguments surrounding those books right now, but they have been well rehearsed by many other writers, online and off.) The decision gets much trickier when considering the Frank Miller and Alan Moore books, though in these particular cases, it somehow feels right to nominate the writers as the “auteurs”.

ITEM! Brendan McCarthy has a new comic that needs a publisher. C’mon, publisher-guys. This is a no-brainer.

AXE COP MOMENT OF THE WEEK: I think this speaks for itself:

REMAKE/REMODEL redoes Wonder Woman, and without chokers and leather jackets, for the most part. My shout-outs this week go to Felipe Sobreiro and Andrew Nixon:

That’s the week, full stop. Or maybe semi-colon; see anything cool this week?