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Shelf Porn straight from the silver screen

by  in Comic News Comment

Welcome to a different kind of Shelf Porn, as today Eric shares his home office filled with all sorts of cool movie items, masks, toys and, of course, some comics. “My philosophy on collecting has always been to surround yourself with things that speak to you and pull particular feelings out of you,” Eric said. “Whenever possible, I try to find cheaper items and improve upon them, and this has also become a fun part of the hobby.”

If you’d like to share your collection with us, you can find details on how to do that at the end of this post.

And now here’s Eric …

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My name is Eric, and this is my home office. Lots of comics, toys, props, masks and other goodies. The parts of my collection that are displayed capture a segment of comics, horror, film and general warm fuzzies of nostalgia from my childhood. My philosophy on collecting has always been to surround yourself with things that speak to you and pull particular feelings out of you. Whenever possible, I try to find cheaper items and improve upon them, and this has also become a fun part of the hobby. I would venture to say that about half of my collection falls into this category.

The Cap shield is a Halloween item that I cleaned up a bit, and the WW2 helmet was a plastic Halloween army helmet that I textured and painted.

Jason’s hockey mask was store-bought at a Toys R Us, just repainted and distressed.

Boba Fett’s helmet was created from a Rubie’s Jango Fett helmet, repainted, textured and weathered.

My take on an Iron Man helmet was created using a resin War Machine paintball mask, which I repainted and weathered.

Freddy’s eyes were created using Ping-Pong balls, red thread for veins, paper print outs of pupils, and clear coat spray-paint.

Audrey 2 was made from Styrofoam and a few craft store plants.

Hope you enjoy!


























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If you’d like to see your collection featured here on Robot 6, here’s what you need to do:

1. Take some photos and save them as jpgs.
2. Write up a little something about your collection.
3. Send them to me in an email. Please put the text into an email and attach the images as separate files; don’t embed them into a Word doc. Uploading them to Dropbox or a similar service also works.