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Shelf Porn | Protecting your collection from sand and moths

by  in Comic News Comment

Welcome to Shelf Porn, our weekly look at the collections of fans from around the world. Today’s collection comes from Guido Cuadros from Lima, Perú. It’s definitely a different kind of photo set than you’re probably used to seeing here, as Guido and his pal Grumpy Cat battle sand and moths to keep his collection protected.

If you’d like to see your collection here on Shelf Porn, check out all the details on how to make that happen.

And now here’s Guido …

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Hi, I’m Guido Cuadros from Lima, Perú. I am 32 years old and have been collecting comics for almost all of my life, since I was a kid (even when i didn´t know how to read, i asked my grandma to read me the comics, while i looked at the pictures). I have a comic-related blog where i write reviews, articles, interviews, analysis of the local market and stuff like that since 2009. I love reading comics and also the news sites and forums, like CBR or Bleeding Cool. Well, let’s talk about my collection and how I store my comics. First thing to say is that I’m not the “accumulator” kind of collector, those who never sell anything and keep everything forever. In my “peak moments” I have had like 10 times more comics than the ones I currently own. But, you know, in recent years I kind of have changed my mentality: I only keep the comics that I really, really care for, the ones I know I’ll want to re-read several times in the future. Because, you won’t take all this paper to the tomb with you, you know. You have to learn to be selective.

Well, I always see great collections and great shelves in SHELF PORN, most of them very neat and aseptic, some even look like little museums! My room is like the antithesis of that. Ok, the “sentimental reasons” are: I am not that obsessed with order and cleanness like others, and also don’t have the money to buy those expensive shelfs (hey, if I have money in my hands, I’ll buy comics with it!) But there are also some “scientific reasons” why I don’t put my comics on shelves: I live very near of some big sand mountains (a couple of kilometers from my home), so you can imagine that dust is a recurrent problem. And, here in Lima, every summer, we have like a moth invasion. Yeah, every January and February, every house in Lima is attacked by millions of baby moths who lose their wings and start searching something to eat, and their favorite meal is wood, or even better: paper. So, I don’t want my comics to be recipients of dust, nor want I them to be baby moth food, and that’s why i keep most of them in plastic bags, and then put the bags -full of comics-, inside plastic boxes or in drawers. Of course, I’ve put some of my “jewels” out of their bags so I can photograph them. ENJOY!


This is my desk, where i put my most recent acquisitions, and the comics i’ll read through the week (I always read in my bed). You can see everything is in bags, because of the dust and moths problems i talked earlier. Also some rolled up non-used posters and that beautiful V-Mask.


Almost 70% of the walls in my room are covered with posters. Here you can see some of them, and also my bed, where i read my comics. And my own grumpy cat!


This is my usual method for storaging. Not very eye-kindly or cute, but safe and effective. Comics inside plastic bags and then inside plastic boxes.


Also i put my comics in a chest of drawers, all inside plastic bags.


Some stickers. I have a small collection of them in the side of a wood shelf. There you can see ”2 cañones” a peruvian comic character, or that amazing beetle-guitar some friend designed in photoshop.


Ok, comics! Most of the Love and Rockets TPB’s by Fantagraphics.


Another angle of the L&R TPB’s.


Alan Moore is one of my favorite comic writers. Here are most of the TPB’s of his amazing ABC Universe.


Carlos Giménez (Spain), another of my favorite comic artists. Here you can see a lot of ”absolute” editions of comics like: Barrio, Paracuellos, 36-39, Los profesionales. Also some Satrapi comics, a Kirby’s Demon HC and the graphic novel Paul Auster’s Ciudad de Cristal (by Mazzucchelli).


These are peruvian editions of comics by Marvel and DC. A local newspaper sell them on a regular basis, (they print 10 000 copies, and distribute them all along Perú, at a very cheap price). Here you can see sagas like All Star Superman, Batman Hush or Iron man Extremis.


I love big, extra sized art books (comic related or not) as well.


DALÍ, My favorite painter of all time. This is an awesome edition by TASCHEN. Kind of an absolute edition, with all his paintings, in two books inside a case, it weights a ton!


These are some HC’s, in bags on my desk. Remember: dust and moths, dust and moths.


Every serious collector asks himself every day: What comic would I save in case of fire, earthquake or any other unexpected disaster? Well, in my case, these books will be my choice. My Jodorowsky comics collection.


My Jodorowsky books, another angle so you can see he covers.


More posters over my desk. Some Iron Maiden staff.


This is the entry/exit of my room, more posters as you see.


And this is my blog! www.comicapocalipsis.blogspot.com

If you’d like to see your collection featured here on Robot 6, here’s what you need to do:

1. Take some photos and save them as jpgs.
2. Write up a little something about your collection.
3. Send them to me in an email.

Some additional tips:

1. Although we don’t have a minimum or maximum limit on photos, usually 10-15 should suffice. They also don’t need to be huge, so if you can shrink them down so they are less than 1000 x 1000, that would be great. You can help make your collection look nice by being sure to focus, use the right lighting, dust your shelves beforehand, etc.
2. You can either write something up that’ll appear at the beginning of the post, or you can describe each item. Be sure to indicate where each image should be placed within your write-up, but don’t embed the images into a Word doc. Just put the file name in brackets where you want the image to appear.
3. When sending images using something like YouSendIt or DropBox, please keep in mind that I may not get to your submission for a month or more, so make sure you don’t delete them or that they won’t expire.
4. Please include your name (just your first name is fine) and location with your write-up.
5. There’s no need to send an inquiry about whether or not we want to feature your collection; that’ll just slow the process down. Send your full submission, and if I have any questions or issues I’ll get back to you. Right now we have a pretty deep backlog of submissions, so if you don’t see your collection right away, don’t despair — it’s coming!