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Send Us Your Shelf Porn!

by  in Comic News Comment

Is it time for Shelf Porn once again? You bet your sweet bippy it is! And we’ve got a heck of a collection to share with you this week, from Caren Pilgrim, who runs the Peanuts Collectibles Web site. As you might imagine, she has quite the Peanuts-inspired collection herself.

Upon coming across her Web site, I emailed Caren and asked if she would be willing to share some photos of her collection with Robot 6 readers. Here’s what she sent in …

The “Snoopy Room” also serves as the guest room. Just wake up and feel like a kid again! I keep the room closed since I hate the inevitable dust. Altogether, I have at least 11,000 unique items, give or take. Almost 8,000 of them are cataloged on my website, CollectPeanuts.com. The Snoopy room is rotated on a yearly basis and is always in a state of continuous accumulation.


Sit down at the vintage child-size chrome table and have a tea party with Snoopy. I’m just glad I never have to pick up my toys again!


From this vantage, we can sorta see the toy box shaped like Snoopy’s Doghouse full of plush Snoopys and Belles. Also, I have a Snoopy Splash n’ Play toy, for hooking up to a hose in the summer and running through its random jets of cold water. A Snoopy Phone is in the top corner with a matching Snoopy Phone bulletin board.


This bookcase feature some of my favorite Asian collectibles and other American favorites. The bottom shelf has a Snoopy Speedway. It’s battery operated and brings the cars back up to the top so they can race again and again without human intervention.


On the top shelf, I have a Snoopy Timex Watch display, a Japanese Diet Pepsi Aluminum bottle and an Uncle Sam Snoopy Bank. Below, are some of my Hallmark Greeting Books from the 1970’s filled with quick bits of wisdom from the Peanuts Gang and used as greeting cards. The taller books on the far left are pop-up books from Hallmark in the 1970’s.


A few of my Peanuts Anniversary books and a Schulz biography mixed with a McCoy Doghouse Cookie Jar, a 1958 Linus Hungerford Doll, and a couple Anri Wooden music boxes, also featuring Linus.


This shelf holds the earliest paperback collections of Peanuts comic strips published by Holt, Reinhart & Winston. Many of them first or early editions with a few French and Spanish version too! A They are fiercely guarded by Samurai Snoopy. Snoopy-in-the-box is always ready to spring into action.


Along with some Asian Snoopy figurines are gift books published by Harper Collins from the 1990’s.


Our next bookcase, containing many treasures, and not just Peanuts. I absolutely love the Peanuts growing chart next to it. There aren’t many collectibles with Vulture Snoopy on them. I’m not sure if I want to grow that tall if there’s a vulture waiting for me!


The top shelf contains some newer Peanuts strip collections on the left, and non-Peanuts Schulz works on the right. The orange doghouse is a music box/bank that plays music while Snoopy dances, but only if you put money in!


Lucy dominates this shelf of Determined gift books such as the perennial favorite, Happiness is a Warm Puppy. Snoopy’s garage embodies one of those toys I never got as a kid. Nothing like ramps for your die-cast cars!


The Snoopy Flying Ace Mattel Skeddidler and Red Baron music box set the scene for one of my most prized possessions: film from Snoopy Come Home. The box contains an alternate opening title sequence, scenes cut from a foreign version, negatives and storyboard animations. Beside the film are TV special and movie based books.


I always get a kick out of these Snoopy fast food banks! Nothing like dog hair on your hot dog! Also, I have some later Peanuts strip compilation books, both American and foreign. The Anri music box with Schroeder on his piano is also a treat!


My Grandfather’s copy of The Smithsonian Collection of Newspaper Comics is the most noteworthy item here. It was one of the factors that started me on this tailspin of comic strip love. When I was bored at their house, it time drag out the gigantic book of comic strips. Little Nemo was always a treat, even if I couldn’t read. Ahhh… memories!

Also in residence, Bloom County, Robotman, Pogo and Bizarro. I pick up what I can when there are cheap sales at the local Half-Price Books store. There’s more non-Peanuts books where these came from. It’s just a matter of making them disappear from my parent’s house.


When you have this many Snoopys, collector guides are a must. My most dog-earred is Peanuts Home Collection. The binders are filled with trading cards, comic books, greeting cards, magazine ads and even pogs!


Video cabinets are perfect for those paperback books from Fawcett Crest. My dad had about a dozen of them from his childhood that he passed on to me. He got me started, it’s all his fault. There’s nothing he can do about it. If he only knew what he was getting himself into!


This corner of the room has World Tour Snoopy Happy Meal Toys from Asia in the doghouse case, a 1974 calendar with a hilarious image, a Worlds of Wonder Talking Snoopy store display and Groucho Marx, of all people. Hear Snoopy talk on Youtube!


Warning! This room is protected by an attack Border Collie!