Month of African-American Comics – Molly Danger

by  in Comic News Comment
Month of African-American Comics – Molly Danger

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. A quick note – since this month is so relatively short, I’ll be featuring an extra comic every week, for a total of 32 comics spotlighted! Here is a list of all the comics spotlighted so far!

Today we take a look at Jamal Igle’s Molly Danger, which I was actually planning to feature on the site anyways as part of my Best of 2013 spotlight series.

Igle has always been a really strong artist, but he showed off his writing skills with this project. He created it and wrote and penciled it, with inks by Juan Castro and colors by Romulo Fajardo, Jr.

The basic set-up is that there is the once-quiet town of Coopersville, New York is now the centerpiece of all sorts of super-villain craziness. Check out what happens when one of these villains attacks…

What an amazing splash page that is, right?

Molly Danger has her own special team of support staff, D.A.R.T. (Danger’s Action Response Team). In this first volume, things change when a local police helicopter pilot is promoted to the team. Here he is in the beginning helping Molly (against regulations, of course)…

The importance of Briggs is that he is always willing to ignore rules if he thinks they stand in the way of doing what is right and this comes into play when he enters the world of Molly Danger. You see, appearances to the contrary, Molly is not actually a young girl. She is in an alien who has remained perpetually 10 years old for over twenty years now. The agency that serves her also controls her and makes a point to isolate her. It is not until Briggs joins the team that he introduces her to his new step-son and things change for Molly for the first time in years. This is a being that desires a family – desires to feel like she is part of something real and that sadness has true resonance. Igle has created a sharp dynamic here.

MEanwhile, of course, the art is great. Igle and Castro do an excellent job on art and Fajardo’s colors are awesomely vibrant.

The first volume of Molly Danger introduced us to a great new character that I hope to see a lot more of over the years.

You can buy the first volume of Molly Danger at Action Lab’s website here.