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Marvel’s Star Wars Explores The Prequel Era In Yoda-Centric Tale

by  in CBR Exclusives, Comic News Comment
Marvel’s Star Wars Explores The Prequel Era In Yoda-Centric Tale

SPOILER WARNING: This article contains spoilers for “Star Wars” #26, on sale now.


The final chapter of “Star Wars'” previous arc concluded with a big development: C-3PO has been captured by the Imperials. Last month’s “Star Wars” #25 saw the Rebels succeed in delivering supplies to their allies on the other side of an Imperial blockade, but not without losing one of their own. In addition to showing the immediate aftermath of the previous arc, this month’s “Star Wars” #26 — written by Jason Aaron with art by Salvador Larroca — integrates the mythology of the prequel trilogy into the flagship “Star Wars” title.

RELATED: Luke Uses [SPOILER] For The First Time In Star Wars #25

In the opening segment of the issue, Threepio’s counterpart R2-D2 commandeers an X-wing and takes off to rescue his droid companion — something none of the human Rebels seem interested in doing. Luke takes off after Artoo in his X-wing, but the little astromech droid outruns Luke by shutting off his hyperdrive. With Artoo off on a rescue mission, Luke turns to the handwritten journal of his dead mentor Obi-Wan Kenobi for guidance.

Luke cracks open the journal and begins to read the tale of an unnamed Jedi’s mission to rescue a young Force user in need.

"Star Wars" #26

“Star Wars” #26 interior art by Salvador Larroca and Edgar Delgado

It’s common knowledge that Jedi come and take Force users from their home planets in order to train them in the ways of the Force. But this planet has Flesh Mongers on it, a group of criminals that refuse to let anyone off-world without getting paid first. Luckily for the young Force-user, a Jedi has come to his rescue.

"Star Wars" #26

“Star Wars” #26 interior art by Salvador Larroca and Edgar Delgado

It should be pointed out that Obi-Wan’s journal only refers to Yoda as “the Jedi.” That’s an important point to make, as this story takes place in the months after “A New Hope” and Luke hears about Yoda for the first time in “The Empire Strikes Back.” Luke’s reading a story about Yoda without knowing that it’s about Yoda.

So far Obi-Wan’s journal, which Luke discovered in the opening arc of the series, has provided plenty of cutaway adventures from the main storyline. A solo, standalone Obi-Wan Kenobi adventure has popped up in-between every “Star Wars” storyarc. This time around, though, Luke’s reading a tale that goes further back in time to before the Clone Wars. Additionally, Obi-Wan’s documented a Jedi’s tale that’s not his own, and it’s going to last for an arc of its own rather than just be a standalone issue.

As the enforcers approach Yoda, ready to keep him from the imprisoned boy and rough the Jedi up, the diminutive warrior raises his hands.

"Star Wars" #26

“Star Wars” #26 interior art by Salvador Larroca and Edgar Delgado

Using the Force, Yoda controls the enforcers and makes them knock each other out. Within seconds, the entire Flesh Monger crew is knocked out on the floor, leaving Yoda free to rescue the young Force-user — named Lo — and escort him to his new life on Coruscant.

Outside, Yoda meets up with two more prequel-era Jedi — Qui-Gon Jinn and his young padawan Obi-Wan Kenobi. Yoda entrusts them with Lo, asking the Jedi to take him to Coruscant. Yoda, it seems, has felt a great disturbance in the Force.

"Star Wars" #26

“Star Wars” #26 interior art by Salvador Larroca and Edgar Delgado

The unusual Force call, it seems, was directed to Yoda as Qui-Gon couldn’t feel it himself. Yoda journeyed far to a planet not found on any star maps and surrounded by a dense asteroid belt. Yoda landed on the mysterious and seemingly lifeless planet and was greeted by its inhabitants…

"Star Wars" #26

“Star Wars” #26 interior art by Salvador Larroca and Edgar Delgado

Yoda comes face to face with group of children that have seemingly ben fending for themselves for an unrevealed period of time.

This issue brings a number of elements from the prequel trilogy into play in the main “Star Wars” series. In addition to showing Yoda in his prime Jedi days, it also marks Qui-Gon Jinn’s Marvel Comics debut. There’s even another shout out to the prequels; early in the issue, Darth Vader orders the destruction of C-3PO, calling him “nothing more than useless junk.” This command stands out as noteworthy considering that Vader built Threepio. It’s easy to read into Vader’s command as his desire to destroy one of the last remnants of his life as Anakin Skywalker. “Yoda’s Secret War” continues next month.

“Star Wars” #27 arrives in stores on January 25, 2017.

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