Lieberman Presents “Term Life”

by  in Comic News Comment
Lieberman Presents “Term Life”

Lieberman and Thornborrow tell the tale of “Term Life”

“If Nick Barrow can stay alive for 21 days, he’ll die happy.”

That’s how writer A.J. Lieberman describes the premise of “Term Life,” his new original graphic novel published through Image Comics and illustrated by Nick Thornborrow, a man with no relation to the book’s similarly named main character.

“Term Life” focuses on Nick Barrow, a man who specializes in planning heists and tricks and selling them off to the highest bidder. But when one of Nick’s planned heists goes horribly wrong, everyone involved wants him dead – that includes mob bosses, contract killers and even the most corrupt cops that local law enforcement has to offer. With so many targets on his back, Nick knows that he’s running out of time.

To that end, he enacts a plan to take out a life insurance policy on himself made payable to his estranged daughter, Cate. Solid on paper, Nick’s plan has a fairly sizable hole: the policy doesn’t take effect for 21 days, and he knows he’ll be lucky if he survives for 21 hours. Combine that with the fact that he now has to meet his adolescent daughter for the very first time while saving her from the very people trying to kill him, it’s pretty safe to say that Nick Barrow has seen better weeks.

CBR News reached out to Lieberman to find out more about “Term Life,” the themes he’s exploring through this high octane crime thriller and much more – but reading the interview is only half of the fun! Courtesy of Lieberman, Thornborrow and Image Comics, CBR is proud to present an exclusive first look at all 34 pages from the first chapter of “Term Life” for your viewing pleasure!

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CBR News: Let’s take it from the top, A.J. The premise for “Term Life” – taking out a life insurance policy and having to survive 21 days to see it through – is intriguing, to say the least. How did you develop the idea for the book?

A.J. Lieberman: I knew I wanted to write an OGN, and after I hit upon the life insurance angle and the ticking clock of having to stay alive for 21 days while waiting for the policy to go into effect, I knew I had something very compelling. It was just a matter of developing a story that took the best advantage of those conceits, and it seemed natural that it would be some kind of crime story.