pinterest-p mail bubble share2 google-plus facebook twitter rss reddit linkedin2 stumbleupon
TOP

CBR

The Premium The Premium The Premium

Issue #193

by  in CBR Exclusives Comment
Issue #193
  • THIS WEEK:

    RESURRECTING DEAD TECHNIQUES: breaking free of servitude to film

    CREATING COMICS STEP BY STEP: nuts, bolts and other mechanical aspects of writing comics

    PAPER MOVIES: what’s going on at my other website these days

    CHAIN MAIL SUIT: more readers bite back – or maybe not

    RIDING TANDEM WITH THE RANDOM: an assortment of brief thoughts on media, politics, books and other items

  • A few of us were discussing the other day comics storytelling techniques once widely used that have mostly fallen out of favor. The thought balloon, for instance. Once it was among the most common elements of comics, certainly of what passes for “mainstream” comics, though its function was largely expositional.
    From SHOWCASE 24 ©1959 DC Comics Inc. Story by John Broome, art by Gil Kane and Joe Giella.

    Other once common features of comics that have faded into the background include sound effects (still in use but frowned on in many circles), omniscient narration captions (ditto), flashbacks (more prominent but still frowned on by many editors and readers), and the footnoted reference is pretty much extinct.

    From GREEN LANTERN 1 ©1959 DC Comics Inc. Story by John Broome, art by Gil Kane and Joe Giella.

    Which, when you think about it, is a pretty strange thing to eliminate in an era fixated on ever-increasing connections between different comics and ever more complex internal continuity within comics.

    There are a few reasons all these went out of fashion, and curtailing the use of the various techniques was, at least for a time, absolutely necessary for the medium. Cutting the umbilical cord, after a fashion. Most of these techniques were used to dumb comics down and keep them down. More than anything else, the ’66 BATMAN TV show made us aware how embarrassing sound effects could be, to the point they became emblematic of the mindlessly juvenile nature of many comic books, and the constant presence of WHAM! BIFF! BAM! in the headlines of any newspaper stories about comics since has just hammered the very dull point home. The omniscient narrator became a deus ex machine for exposition and background, while footnoted references started overwhelming panels. (When you’ve got four different footnotes for a single thought balloon, someone’s not doing something right.) Thought balloons have had their uses, but more often than not they’ve been used for mere idiot exposition: Spider-Man swinging over a scene of Dr. Octopus beating up some cops, and Spider-Man has the thought balloon, “There’s Dr. Octopus – beating up some cops!” Well, duh, genius.

    As comics started attracting more adult audiences, many of these techniques were viewed by talent, editors and publishers as embarrassments, vestiges of the juvenilia they were trying to leave behind, and you can call that pretentious if you like but it’s true that the medium did have to start growing up, and still does. Those elements fading into disrepute and limbo broke the stranglehold of house styles, and opened up possibilities for experimentation with and exploration of other techniques, many of which, like the first person narration caption that supplanted the thought balloon, are now also, and often inappropriately, overused. The other factor in the downplay of old techniques and the elimination of others was the new coziness to (some may say jealousy of) film that the medium’s been promoting since the ’70s. From the moment comics started being reduced to “storyboards on paper” (though there are stories that function best if approached that way, and I still believe a beginning wide audience can best be attracted by “gateway” comics produced to be as similar in effect to the more widely familiar medium of film as possible – but they’d also have to feature material as least vaguely familiar to moviegoers as well) the techniques that are functional strictly in comics – the thought balloon, sound effects, etc. – have fallen into disrepute because they were reminders that, when all is said and done, the comics medium is not like film. Certainly as comics companies have gravitated toward film as a revenue and promotion source and a talent pool, trumped up similarities to film have worked to our field’s interest.

    We haven’t lost anything because those techniques haven’t been lost, only dismissed. It was necessary to throw them to the side to rid ourselves of bad habits (not that others haven’t taken their place), to demonstrate that we could be part of the “cultural community,” to mollify the pointless hunger for “respect” that affects so many in the comics community, both pro and fan. To prove that we weren’t “just comics.”

    Well, guess what? That Rubicon’s been crossed. There will always be people who dismiss the medium as intrinsically worthless, but so what? Sure, there’s still plenty of stupidity in comics to apologize for – there’s plenty of stupidity everywhere – but it’s not them we need to apologize to. Screw ’em. Comics are as accepted as they need to be, and if we want more it’s time to stop trying to make them acceptable and start behaving as though acceptance of comics is the most natural thing in the world.

    And it’s time to recover the “lost” techniques that work only in comics, and put them to use again, and better use. There’s nothing inherently diseased about any of them; the only real problem with them was the way they came to be customarily used. It’s the same principle as the multi-title crossover event, which became overdone and, worse, progressively badly done, until they were no longer salable, and companies steered away from them. Now they’re back, and the question isn’t whether they should or shouldn’t be done – they are being done – or even whether their resurrection represents a paucity of imagination on the part of talent and publishers. The question, and the challenge, is whether they can be done well enough to maintain or even grow a readership over a period of time. There’s no reason there can’t be good crossover events, even if we aren’t used to them anymore. Likewise, there’s nothing about thought balloons that automatically makes them bad. A traditional argument against them is that we can’t read people’s thoughts – and it isn’t done in the movies either – but all that is, really, is an argument that comics are neither real life nor film and can accomplish things neither of those can. (Lord knows there are plenty of things film can accomplish that comics can’t, but things aren’t entirely unbalanced against us.)

    An old friend of mine used to teach a comics aesthetics extension course, and was fond of saying that black and white wasn’t really possible – in either film or comics – before color was introduced. Obviously black and white existed, but what he meant was that black and white can’t stand out or be used as a special technique until it’s no longer the dominant technique and has something to stand in contrast to. When color became the dominant technique, black and white was suddenly available for a special effect, but, before color, it wasn’t. And suddenly filmmakers or cartoonists were able to invent new uses for black and white that weren’t open to them previously. It became not obsolete but another tool in the toolbox. Like the exclamation mark. There was a time when publishers insisted on exclamation marks at the end of every sentence, because printing processes were too crappy to guarantee periods and exclamations were clear marks of sentence endings. When only exclamation marks (or question marks) were available, exclamation marks were essentially meaningless. But printing has improved, and the exclusivity of the exclamation mark shattered. And now when you see an exclamation mark in comics, it means something. Unless the author doesn’t understand the use of exclamation marks.

    Recently I began doing ‘Weird Date’ stories for Michael Chabon’s ESCAPIST at Dark Horse, and investigated ’50s romance comics for research. What’s most interesting about them are various storytelling techniques that were mostly abandoned as superhero comics overwhelmed the market, though one used to show up in superhero comics when I was a kid as well, particularly those like THE FLASH that were edited by Julie Schwartz: a separate panel that was essentially just a narrative caption – with one small, simple illustration included to punctuate it. The juxtaposition could serve various purposes: to punctuate a thought, set up a transition, put across a necessary point or action that nonetheless required no more elaborate illustration, or denote the passage of time. Just that one technique opens up all kinds of possibilities – and, yet, it’s abandoned, unused and all but unknown.

    Writer unknown. Art by Alex Toth and Mike Peppe.

    I’m not suggesting that any of these techniques be simply reinstated. As with crossover series, simply repeating the stupidities of the past is a recipe for eventual disaster, no matter how much some of us might like to revel in watered-down imitations of the way things were. But it’s time not to abandon everything we’ve learned from film but to return to many of the things that comics can do that other media can’t, to find new uses for old techniques and redeem them with imagination and creativity. To celebrate comics as comics. To use everything we have to go another step forward.

    It’s not the techniques that are inane, it’s the way they’re used. The answer to that isn’t to abandon them but to use them better, and it’s time to prove we can do it.

  • Creating Comics Step By Step, Step 8: Picking Up The Little Pieces.

    This is a down and dirty series on making comics step by step, from conception to post-publication.

    Before you sit down to write that plot or script, there are a few little rules of thumb and shorthand notations to get straight. While there aren’t really across-the-board standards of any kind in comics, except what sells sells, there are a few things you could stand to know about.

    If you’re pitching to a comics company, the editor and/or publisher are likely going to want some outline of your idea before you begin. Even if you’re your own editor/publisher, it’s usually worth it to at least lightly sketch out the direction of your story. I reiterate: you can’t really know what a story is about until you know how it ends, and you can always change your ending in process if something better occurs to you or if you have a revelation about the hitherto unknown true meaning of your story, and knowing how it ends will at least provide you with a direction to move in so you can prevent your story from meandering. Don’t get me wrong: there may have been excellent comics stories that were created on the fly (I can’t think of any off the top of my head, but my knowledge is hardly encyclopedic), but usually the opposite is true. If you’re determined to “free your muse” and go structureless, at least take some good improve classes to learn how that sort of thing works. (Yes, there are rules.)

    Plots are just plots, a listing of the events of a story. If an artist will be drawing your story from a plot (known as ‘the Marvel method,’ even though even Marvel doesn’t employ it much anymore), include all necessary action and as much emotional behavior as necessary to get the story across. Depending on the artist; some work much better in this method than others, and it may take some trial and error to figure out how elaborate you have to be. Plots can be broken down by page –

    Page One

    A subway station somewhere in New York, where COMMUTERS wait impatiently for their train, though they don’t mingle, and a Rasta-style black man, SOAPY, in jeans and an old army jacket sits on a bench, reading a tabloid, the Manhattan Guardian. Soapy lowers the paper a bit and sniffs the air, his eyes darting warily down the subway tunnel. The headlights of a train approach, but no one reacts, because it seems to be any other train. Until it gets closer, and then we can see a grinning white skull painted on the front of the train, between the lights. From inside the train, we look out – past the silhouettes of men with cutlasses – at the startled commuters, including Soapy, waiting on the platform outside.

    Page Two

    DOUBLE PAGE SPLASH. PIRATES, reminiscent of traditional Caribbean pirates in their dress but also wearing more modern clothes and a couple carrying semi-automatic pistols instead of the cutlasses the others carry, flood off the train in an orgy of ecstatic violence: running commuters through, taking women executives prisoner, terrifying the other commuters who break and run in sheer panic, as a newspaper is prominently swept toward us. (It’s on the newspaper that we’ll put the title and credits, and whatever else we feel like.)

    Etc.

    Those were the first three pages of Grant Morrison and Cameron Stewart’s SEVEN SOLDIERS: GUARDIAN #1 (DC Comics), which was the closest comic at hand. Morrison probably wrote the scene in full script, but this is a good exercise for anyone trying to get a handle on writing plots. Take any comic at hand, and reduce it to a plot, trying to get all the necessary information about what’s in the pictures into the smallest amount of text possible. Smallest amount doesn’t mean fewest words, it means the minimum necessary to convey all the elements necessary for the artist to draw what you envision.

    From SEVEN SOLDIERS: GUARDIAN #1 ©2005 DC Comics Inc. Story by Grant Morrison, art by Cameron Stewart.

    As with screenplays, it’s a good idea to capitalize the name of any character the first time we meet them, including “general” characters like COMMUTERS or PIRATES. (It’s not necessary to capitalize them thereafter.) This makes it clear who’s necessary to a scene, and if there are too many capitalized names in your plot, it will quickly become clear you’re working with too many characters and need to reconsider. Additional information that affects the art but isn’t a part of the art directions should be put in parentheses, to separate it, as with the final line of the dummy plot above, while notes to editors, letterers or colorists should go in separate paragraphs, also in brackets or parentheses to separate them from art directions. Rewrite whole published stories into plots along the above lines and in no time you’ll start seeing story techniques and setup techniques that are (hopefully) invisible to the published work. (Just don’t change a few names and try to submit them as your own stories.)

    Plots may also be done for entire stories, or for sections of stories (pg. 1-6 this happens, pg. 7-9 that happens, etc.), allowing the artist greater leeway for breaking the story down into pictures. This works well if the artist is particularly experienced and/or has a strong story sense. It works less well, sometimes even disastrously, if they don’t.

    Scripts use roughly as much art direction as plots do, but are usually broken down into page and panel and include all the captions, dialogue, sound effects – really every element that will be in the final story. Again, there is no real standard for script format in comics anymore, but arguably the most standard is as follows (again cribbing SEVEN SOLDIERS: GUARDIAN #1, but I want to emphasize this is not Grant Morrison’s full script if he in fact wrote the story in full script, and I have no idea what Morrison’s script would look like):

    Page 1

    Panel 1: A subway station somewhere in New York, where COMMUTERS wait impatiently for their train, though they don’t mingle, and a Rasta-style black man, SOAPY, in jeans and an old army jacket sits on a bench, reading a tabloid, the Manhattan Guardian.

    No dialogue.

    Panel 1: A subway station somewhere in New York, where COMMUTERS wait impatiently for their train, though they don’t mingle, and a Rasta-style black man, SOAPY, in jeans and an old army jacket sits on a bench, reading a tabloid, the Manhattan Guardian.

    No dialogue.

    Panel 2: Soapy lowers the paper a bit and sniffs the air, his eyes darting warily down the subway tunnel.

    SOAPY 1: ->SNFF? NEWSPAPER LOGO 2: THE MANHATTAN GUARDIAN

    HEADLINE ON PAPER 3: HEADLESS HORROR IN HAUNTED HOSPITAL

    SUB-HEADLINE ON PAPER 4: EXCLUSIVE PHOTOS INSIDE!

    Panel 3: The headlights of a train approach, but no one reacts, because it seems to be any other train.

    No dialogue.

    Panel 4: Until it gets closer, and then we can see a grinning white skull painted on the front of the train, between the lights.

    No dialogue.

    Panel 5: From inside the train, we look out – past the silhouettes of men with cutlasses – at the startled commuters, including Soapy, waiting on the platform outside.

    No dialogue.

    PAGES 2-3

    Panel 1: DOUBLE PAGE SPLASH. PIRATES, reminiscent of traditional Caribbean pirates in their dress but also wearing more modern clothes and a couple carrying semi-automatic pistols instead of the cutlasses the others carry, flood off the train in an orgy of ecstatic violence: running commuters through, taking women executives prisoner, terrifying the other commuters who break and run in sheer panic, as a newspaper is prominently swept toward us.

    TITLE (on newspaper page) 1: PIRATES OF MANHATTAN.

    CREDITS (under title, on newspaper) 2: Grant Morrison – Writer Cameron Stewart – Artist Pat Brosseau – Letters Moose Bauman – Colors Harvey Richards – Asst. Ed. Peter Tomasi – Editor

    You’ll notice that every dialogue/caption/sound effect is numbered in the order in which is occurs on the page. The numbering starts over with each page.

    There’s no real limit on how verbose your pages can get, and various stories demand more words than others. The rule of thumb, from when the six panel grid was king, is no more than 35 words (including captions, dialogue and sound effects) should appear per panel. There’s no particular reason to stick religiously to that, but no particular reason to deviate from it as a matter of course either. Bear in mind that space in a comic book is limited (it’s also limited in most “commercial” graphic novels, since many publisher judge profitability against page count, with extended length seeing as either raising the price or eating into profits) and if you’re writing many pages in a row with several hundred words per page, odds are you’re trying to jam too much story in, and you should rethink. (You might discover you have exactly what’s right for your story, but it never hurts to double check.)

    Some tools for comics that don’t much apply to other media:

    Bold words. These are words in dialogue that are emphasized – to create rhythm, to punch home information or emotional states, to establish speech patterns, and various other thing. While once way overused, often with no ear for how the sentences would sound if spoken aloud. (You’d think every character had the peculiar lilt of Jerry Lewis’ film persona.) Fortunately, their use has somewhat fallen out of favor, meaning that when bold words are used, they can now deliver more punch than previously. (In comics, bold words are usually used in lieu of italics.)

    Contrarily, you don’t bold words in your script to show you want them bolded in the lettering. You underline them.

    Wrong:

    JAMES 3: Sara said she’d meet us at the restaurant.

    Right:

    JAMES 3: Sara said she’d meet us at the restaurant.

    What you bold changes the meaning of your sentence. Consider this example, also from THE MANHATTAN GUARDIAN (where it was printed unbolded):

    The first example pushes home the sheer weirdness and possibly urgency of the situation, but it’s a direct statement. The second brings an air of uncertainty to the phrase; is the information true or not? The third emphasize place, as if suggesting while we may be apprised of the situation, we’re in the wrong location.

    The fourth is just an illustration of a technique I’ve grown fond of: emphasizing syllables rather than words. Stressing a single syllable is just more like common speech, and in this case drives home the idea that we know something is happening, but we just don’t know what it is.

    Obviously these aren’t the only permutations of meaning in the sentence. You could bold virtually any of the words in the sentence (though some bolded would connote less meaning than others, and under most circumstances you don’t want to leave your readers puzzling out your meaning… unless you do) depending on what you wanted to suggest.

    Other common notations in a script:

    (T) or (thot) – used to indicate a thought balloon.

    LOIS (T) 8: What happened to Clark? I’d swear he just stepped into this phone booth!

    (OP) – used to indicate dialogue coming from off-panel

    SUPERMAN (OP) 9: Up, up, and away!

    (B) or (burst) – used to indicate a “burst” balloon, those balloons with multiple spikes coming off them for extra emphasis, usually to indicate particularly emotionally charged dialogue. Also very common these days is an alternate form of “emphatic” balloon, with has an extra-wide, often colored border to catch attention. It’s the same as a burst and can be referred to with a (B); that’s between you, your editor and your letterer.

    LOIS (B) 10: SUPERMAN! HELP ME!

    SFX: – this is the “character” name for any sound effect used in a panel, and is numbered in sequence with dialogue. Sometimes the source of the sound effect is noted, but there’s no real consensus on that.

    GUN-TOTING THUG 11: Too late, Lane! Your reporting may have sent me to the chair – but I’m taking you with me!

    SFX (gunshot) 12: BLAM

    There are various other mechanical aspects of writing comics, and you’ll doubtless create more to suit your own purposes as you go, but those are the most common forms and shorthands. Master those – it really doesn’t take much – and you’re ready to hold your own at plotting and scriptwriting… provided you’ve got the imagination and creative skills to match.

    Next: Putting it all together.

  • Currently at PAPER MOVIES: had a bit of a shock last week when I suddenly found out the Paper Movies site was (temporarily) defunct because it hadn’t been renewed, and it didn’t take long to figure out why I’d never received any renewal notices – the e-mail address on file with the domain registrar was defunct. Anyway, after rushing to renew, I realized it’s time I paid more attention to the site. Currently available, at the Paper Movies Store

    IMPOLITIC: A Journal Of The Plague Years. A lively 240+ page collection of essays, rants, examinations & projections of politics since 9/11. An e-book in .pdf format, for either print or screen. $5.95 for e-mail delivery/PayPal orders, $8.95 on disk.

    TOTALLY OBVIOUS. Essays and anecdotes on the art, business and ethics of comics and culture, completely collecting the Master Of The Obvious columns that ran from 1999-2001, and still a goldmine of information for anyone considering a career in comics. An e-book in .pdf format, for either print or screen. $5.95 for e-mail delivery/PayPal orders, $8.95 on disk.

    For June only: the IMPOLITIC/TOTALLY OBVIOUS combo pak, both e-books for only $10.95, for either print or screen. PayPal orders only.

    Those looking for the Father’s Day gift for the man who has everything and for whom money is no object will also find a rare one-of-a-kind piece of original art available.

    Also, up this weekend on the site will be the first issue of my creator-owned ENEMY series that ran at Dark Horse in the ’90s, with other works to come (including, possibly, things that aren’t out yet). I’ll be adding to the site regularly all summer, and hopefully it’ll be fully stocked by the time labor day comes around.

  • Well, this is interesting.

    I was going to run several e-mails I’ve gotten over the last week – during which my email program has been going haywire – and when I open the file…

    Nada. They were some good e-mails too.

    If you sent me e-mail in the last seven days, you might want to resend. Sorry about the mess. It’s more or less cleared up now.

  • So this week I get my break from politics. Not that nothing’s going on – Bolton’s nomination to UN ambassador is held up in Congress, Deep Throat’s identity is finally revealed (let’s all break into a chorus of ‘I Spy (For The FBI)’ in honor of him), The French have followed the English in not abandoning their own currency for the European Union’s euro, turns out we (and the British) were heavily bombing Iraq long before our official invasion in an attempt to provoke Saddam Hussein into something we could claim was an act of war and justification for an invasion except he wouldn’t bite, Pat Tillman’s parents have finally gotten fed up with the US government continuing to pitch him as a military hero when he in fact died at the hands of US troops, etc. But, really, how much comment does any of that need? The short version: keep fiddling. The fire department’ll be here any time now. But I should talk: I’ve spent so much time the past week trying to fix problems with my e-mail, not to mention just keeping up with my work, that I’ve barely even heard a news report in the last seven days.

    I’ve just started reading Gerard Jones’ MEN OF TOMORROW, the story of the secret criminal underpinnings of the original comics business, the rise and fall of Superman creators Siegel & Shuster, and numerous other stories from the origins of comics. In the meantime, I can recommend two other books: Kent Harrington’s novel RED JUNGLE and THE DC COMICS GUIDE TO COLORING AND LETTERING COMICS by Mark Chiarello & Todd Klein. Chiarello’s section, on coloring, is direct, simple and comprehensive, with plenty of illustrations and suggestions, and Klein’s, though much shorter (the principles of lettering are much easier to grasp than those of coloring, particularly computer coloring, which at times can be fairly counter-intuitive, is also strong. The best thing is the techniques they describe can be applied to pretty much any comics, not just the mainstream DC books that seemed the main beneficiaries of earlier volumes in the series. Just one thing: I dare anyone to explain where the light source is for the Wonder Woman figure on the front cover. Since light sources are an important aspect of coloring these days, that strikes me as a pretty severe gaffe.

    Mystery writing Harrington has sworn never to write two novels in the same style, and after doing Jim Thompson, Richard Condon and Alfred Hitchcock in earlier novels, he tackles Graham Greene in RED JUNGLE, about a Guatemalan-American man’s return to the land of his mother’s death and his involvement in Guatemalan politics, CIA mischief and an insanely dangerous love affair as he attempts to make his fortune finding and smuggling Mayan antiquities. The first half of the book is a bit slow and spends way too much time on setup, but the second half rolls breathlessly along into a host of twists and surprises, with a lighter touch than Greene himself ever applied to his quasi-mystical political thrillers. RED JUNGLE may not be a great thriller, but it’s an entertaining one, and worth a summer’s read.

    The network season finales dropped like flies, with VERONICA MARS and CSI among the best (though nothing compares to the almost transcendental, mischievous DEADWOOD on HBO). 24 was oddly unsatisfying, the conclusion of the season’s arc almost a footnote to the sudden rush to escort hero Jack Bauer off to a new life after a faked death. THE O.C. and DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES just sort of petered out in all the rising soap suds. But the worst season finale had to be the jumbled CSI MIAMI where the hero’s supposedly dead brother suddenly reappears to reveal he faked his death to work undercover for the Feds. Which is why, I suppose, they send him to a town where everyone knows him. There’s one baffling scene where hero and brother invade the den of mad bombers to save brother’s kidnapped son, and brother is supposedly shot down, only to reappear at the end on an airplane that will carry him, his wife (regular Sofia Milos) and their son to a new life in Brazil. So apparently the point of that shooting scene was so the Feds would think the brother was dead, and forget about him. But… the only witnesses are the bombers, both of whom die without ever telling the Feds about the killing. When they’re alone, the only other witness, the show’s hero, checks brother to make sure he’s okay – bulletproof vest, of course, so it’s good no one thought to shoot him in the head – then tells brother to get out of there before the cops arrive. So why the shooting if there are no witnesses? Are the Feds going to take Hero’s unbiased report at face value, with no body to show for it and no one to have gotten the body away from the scene? What on earth? Not to mention what mother’s going to abandon her home and everything she has to drag her son off to a foreign land where her refound husband has no visible means of support? Huh?

    I guess we just weren’t intended to think about this stuff.

    At least we’ve still got THE SHIELD. For another two weeks, anyway.

    Those wishing to comment should leave messages on the Permanent Damage Message Board. You can also e-mail me but the chances of a reply are next to nil these days, given my workload, though I do read all my e-mail as long as it’s not trying to sell me something. IMPORTANT: Because a lot of people apparently list it in their e-address books, this account has gotten a slew of virus-laden messages lately. They’re no real threat but dealing with them eats up time I don’t really have, to the extent I can no longer accept unsolicited e-mail with attachments. If you want to send something via attachment (say, art samples) ask me first. If I say okay, then send. Unsolicited e-mail with attachments will be wiped from the server without being read. You can also leave messages for me and have discussions on other topics at my Delphi forum, GRAPHIC VIOLENCE. Please don’t ask me how to break into the business, or who to submit work to. The answers to those questions are too mercurial for even me to keep up with.

    Those wanting to subscribe to the WHISPER e-mail newsletter should click here.

    I’m reviewing comics sent to me – I may not like them but certainly I’ll mention them – at

    Steven Grant

    c/o Permanent Damage

    2657 Windmill Pkwy #194

    Henderson NV 89074

    so send ’em if you want ’em mentioned, since I can’t review them unless I see them. Some people have been sending press releases and cover proofs and things like that, which I enjoy getting, but I really can’t do anything with them, sorry. Full comics only, though they can be photocopies rather than the published version. Make sure you include contact information for readers who want to order your book.

    • Ad Free Browsing
    • Over 10,000 Videos!
    • All in 1 Access
    • Join For Free!
    GO PREMIUM WITH CBR
    Go Premium!

    More Videos