Here’s How “Deadpool” Got Away With Using A Marvel Studios Character

by  in Movie News Comment
Here’s How “Deadpool” Got Away With Using A Marvel Studios Character

If you’re an eagle-eyed Deadpool fan, odds are you caught a number of Easter eggs while watching the Merc’s feature film over the weekend. And if you’re equally aware of the ins and outs of the split between characters whose film rights are owned by Fox and those owned by Marvel Studios, then one cameo in particular might have left you wondering how that happened.

During “Deadpool’s” final battle, Ryan Reynolds’ super “hero” briefly recognizes one of the henchmen he’s fighting. The henchman is named Bob and yes, he’s meant to be Marvel’s Bob, Agent of HYDRA. That villainous organization is unquestionably owned by Marvel Studios, as they’ve been a major player in the “Captain America” films and the “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” TV series. While speaking with CinemaBlend, “Deadpool” screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick explained how they got away with using Bob.

“That’s why he’s just called Bob,” said Wernick. “The hardcore fans will go, ‘Oh my God, is that Hydra Bob?’ but the lawyers at Marvel won’t go, ‘Wait, that’s Hydra Bob, they don’t have the rights to it.’ We did take some liberties. Fox has a list of characters that they own and that we can use, and Simon Kinberg, who is a producer on the project, is the keeper of the X universe. So he was a great source for us in knowing what we can use, how it’s going to play into the larger story, and overall arching stories of the X universe. So between Simon and legal, they kind of guided us to what we can and can’t do or have access to, and then it was up to us to see how we were going to use those characters creatively, once we knew we really did have the rights.”

There’s also the matter of where the third act battle takes place; plenty of moviegoers have identified the massive structure Deadpool destroys during his battle with Ajax as a decommissioned Helicarrier, which is another thing that Fox definitely does not have the rights to use. The structure is never called a Helicarrier, though, so it’s possible it was used using the same loophole as Bob. Reese, Wernick or director Tim Miller have yet to weigh in on the Helicarrier theory.

“Deadpool” is in theaters now.