Freedman & Coker Get Romantic with “Undying Love”

by  in Comic News Comment
Freedman & Coker Get Romantic with “Undying Love”

Freedman and Coker profess “Undying Love” in March

Ask anyone who has taken a date to a horror movie and they’ll tell you that scares, monsters and romance have a mysterious connection with one another. Comic creators Tomm Coker and Daniel Freedman plan to explore that relationship in “Undying Love,” a new miniseries shipping in April from Image Comics and Corvx Studios, an action/romance revolving around John Sargent and his new love Mei who, as luck would have it, is a vampire.

Set in modern day Hong Kong, the eight issue series finds Sargent and Mei on a wild journey attempting to recover Mei’s humanity. The trick of it, however, is that they have to kill the vampire who sired Mei, a vampire who just so happens to be incredibly powerful. While on their quest, the pair run afoul of not only vampires, but other creatures of the night in a story weaving together traditional Chinese monsters with the more western interpretations of bloodsuckers, a mythology that Coker and Freedman spent a lot of time customizing to fit their needs. CBR spoke with Coker and Freedman who wrote the story together with Coker doing the art and Freedman coloring the book, and got their take on vampire mythology, romance and how it all comes together in the pages of “Undying Love.”

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CBR News: I’m sure you’re aware that romantic vampire stories are pretty big right now. How does “Undying Love” differ from the “Twilight,” “The Vampire Diaries” and the rest and how would you describe the story to the uninitiated?

Daniel Freedman: The first obvious difference would be the vampires: they have fangs. They don’t sparkle or glimmer or whatever. They don’t attend high school forever. They are mean and nasty. They will rip out your throat and drink your blood.

Freedman: And look at how horribly destructive one single bullet can be to a human body. It only makes sense that the weapons of today, the most destructive in history, would be fatal to even the undead.

Coker: That’s not to say the more powerful vampires are just gonna get gunned down. It still takes a ton to kill ’em. It all plays back into the blood and our idea of a “Blood-Hierarchy” — the purer the blood you were made from the more powerful you become.

Freedman: Like in any kind of breeding, the more purebred the parents, the more purebred the pup and the more that pup will display the characteristics of its breed.

In the world of “Undying Love,” does the world know about vampires? Do the vampires mostly run on their own or stick together?

Freedman: Our vampires function behind closed doors. If they’ve been around long enough and didn’t get all emo about being a vampire, then they’ve probably become successful in business or amassed some sort of wealth and power.

Coker: Or they could be so far down the food chain (made by a weaker vampire) that their only option is to scavenge the alleys as useless fiends.

Freedman: True. The world of “Undying Love” exists on the fringes of society — an entire world of monsters and magic on the peripheral of human awareness.