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Frank Miller Says He’d Like to See Carrie Kelley on the Big Screen

by  in Comic News, Movie News Comment

Frank Miller has said he’d like to see Carrie Kelley join the big-screen world of DC Films — even if he’s not involved with the adaptation. In a video interview with ComicBook.com conducted on the red carpet premiere of the Friday-debuting “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice,” Miller stated that he’d be “very jealous of any appearance of Carrie Kelley,” though he’d be in overall support of the character in live action.

“Carrie Kelley would be the big one,” Miller said, when asked what Batman characters he’d created that he’d like to see in film.

This stands in apparent contrast to earlier comments from Miller on another one of his famous comic book creations, Marvel Comics character Elektra. In December, translated comments attributed to Miller from Brazil’s Comic Con Experience surfaced, on the subject of Elektra’s debut in Netflix and Marvel Television’s “Daredevil” TV series. “They can do whatever they want, that is not her,” Miller was quoted, three months before the new season, the first to feature Elodie Yung as Elektra, debuted.

Later in ComicBook.com’s interview, Miller made a distinction between his work-for-hire creations — like Carrie Kelley and Elektra — and his own creator-owned work, like “Sin City.”

“I’ve had a good long time doing work that I’ve made up out of whole cloth,” Miller said. “I own ‘Sin City,’ if there’s a ‘Sin City’ movie, I’ll make it. With Batman, I’m contributing to a mythos that’s been around for a long time. I’ve had a great time contributing to it, I will gladly contribute to it again, and I want to see what other people do. It’s a big party, we can all join in.”

Carrie Kelley debuted in 1986’s “Batman: The Dark Knight Returns,” written by Miller and illustrated by him, Klaus Janson and Lynn Varley. The character was once speculated to make an appearance in “Batman v Superman,” and in 2013 was introduced to the mainstream timeline of DC Comics’ DC Universe. Currently, the character is a central player in “Dark Knight III: The Master Race,” co-written by Miller and Brian Azzarello, and illustrated by Andy Kubert and Janson.