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Florida fundamentalist group targets Marvel, retailers over Astonishing X-Men #51

by  in Comic News Comment

Declaring Marvel has “crossed the line,” a Florida fundamentalist group has launched an email campaign in an effort to convince the publisher, parent company Disney and retailers to pull from distribution Astonishing X-Men #51, the June issue that depicts the much-publicized wedding of Northstar and Kyle Jinadu.

Asserting that the comic “asks kids to fantasize about having their own same-sex nuptials,” the Florida Family Association laments on its website “that the comic strip actually has a blank wedding that children can use to make their own same-sex wedding. Talk about propaganda.” That’s a reference to the Phil Noto variant cover (above), which depicts wedding photos of 10 heterosexual superhero couples, as well as Northstar and Kyle.

In a call to “take action,” the organization encourages supporters to send a form email to Marvel, Disney and retailers stating that it is “shameful that two companies like Marvel and Disney would deliberately create a superhero homosexual wedding for our children to embrace and mimic. These companies should show more respect to the overwhelming majority of families who do not want their children targeted with immoral social propaganda through comics.”

The FFA targets a dozen Disney and Marvel executives and editors, providing email addresses for the likes of Isaac Perlmutter, Kevin Feige, Robert Iger, Axel Alonso and Tom Brevoort, and singles out Midtown Comics, Lone Star Comics and Comic Book Resources. Within a four-hour period Monday night, CBR received more than 500 identical emails from different addresses.

It’s a familiar tactic by the Florida Family Association, a Tampa-based nonprofit organization whose sole paid employee is founder David Caton, whom The New York Times described last year as an account turned rock-club owner turned born-again Christian. The former executive director of the American Family Association, which launched its own unsuccessful campaign against gay storylines in Marvel and DC Comics titles, Caton appears preoccupied with the perceived dangers of homosexuality, pornography and Islam, spearheading efforts against high school gay-straight alliances and television shows like Degrassi High, Modern Family and All-American Muslim.

Although its website boasts that the FFA “is made up of THOUSANDS OF SUPPORTERS across America who share in the same goal of improving America’s moral environment,” Wajahat Ali of the liberal research group Center for American Progress disputes the claim, telling The Times, “It’s literally one dude with a poorly made Web site, one fringe individual with an e-mail list.”

Here’s the text of the FFA’s form email to Marvel, Disney and retailers:

Please pull X-Men #51 which promotes and asks kids to fantasize about homosexual marriage.

Marvel’s X-Men #51 comic issue has crossed the line by attempting to legitimize same-sex marriage and asking kids to fantasize about their own homosexual wedding.

It is shameful that two companies like Marvel and Disney would deliberately create a superhero homosexual wedding for our children to embrace and mimic.

PLEASE have more respect for the overwhelming majority of families who do not want their children targeted with immoral propaganda through comics.

My family and I urge your company to pull X-Men #51 from distribution.

I look forward to your response.