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Five Goofiest Moments in the First Five Issues of the Legion Feature in Adventure Comics

by  in Comic News Comment

Every day this month will have the five goofiest moment from a five-issue stretch of a particular comic book run. Once a week it will be the ten goofiest moments of a ten-issue stretch. Here is a list of the moments featured so far.

Today we’re looking at Adventure Comics #300-304, specifically the first five Legion of Super-Heroes stories within those comics (Adventure #300 started the first regular Legion of Super-Heroes feature). These issues were written by Jerry Siegel and drawn by John Forte (Al Plastino did a little work on #300).

As always, this is all in good fun. I don’t mean any of this as a serious criticism of the comics in question. Great comics often have goofy moments (Kirby/Lee’s Fantastic Four is one of the best comic book runs of all-time and there were TONS of goofy stuff in those 100 plus issues!).

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Power of super-egotism…

In #303, Lightning Lad and Sun Boy got into an accident. While recuperating, their friends tried to keep them busy. You have to love what Cosmic Boy brings Lightning Lad…


“Your favorite thing to look at…yourself!”

Rinse, lather and repeat…

I love how Sun Boy’s powers are described in #300…


super-radiance sounds like a claim you’d make in a shampoo commercial, not a superpower!

Yes, Cosmic Boy, outwitted. Sure.

In #303, the Legion feels that someone is spying on them. Here’s Cosmic Boy’s brilliant solution to the problem…


Luthor’s complicated plan…

In #300, Luthor sends a robot into the future.


I love that there really is no reason for why he is an adult version of Lex.

I especially love the bit with the tapes “hate Superboy,” etc.

5. You never expect both the Spanish Inquisition and advertising missiles…

In #301, Bouncing Boy explains how he was able to convince the Legion to accept him after they initially turn him down for the lack of practical uses of his power. After the initial refusal, he tries to prove himself…


Oh, of COURSE! An advertising missile!! How foolish of Bouncing Boy not to expect that!

4. How convenient…

In the classic #304, Lightning Lad foils Saturn Girl’s plan to sacrifice herself in place of another Legionnaire. As he lies dying, he explains how he found out about her plot…


“So yeah, he couldn’t tell me until the most dramatic moment because of…uhmm…sun spots, yeah! And oh, you might think, ‘Why not just put me into the Phantom Zone, too’? Well, because of those same sun spots! They’re back!”

So goofy, but such a great issue.

Also, I enjoy “everyone knows you can’t change fate.”

3. A little information can cause a lot of grief…

In #300, Saturn Girl has a plan. The rest of the Legion knows her plan, but she won’t tell Superman because…well…just because…


He’s freaking out, Saturn Girl! Just tell him!!!


And then she forgets to mention, “Oh yeah, this is just temporary”…


You’re a cruel woman, Saturn Girl!

2. Incompetence and laziness rewarded!!

In #301, we learn Bouncing Boy’s origin, and it is one of the goofiest origins ever…



“Please accept me for membership, Legion, I’m both lazy AND incompetent!”

1. The Silver Age, in a nutshell…

In #302, Sun Boy’s powers start giving out. Since he got his powers from being accidentally trapped in an atomic reactor, logically…


After a temporary return of his powers, he is re-emboldened…



I love that he has to take home any trophies he won. They can’t even celebrate his career as a Legionnaire. It’s like he got paid money by a booster and now they have to expunge anything that happened while he was a Legionnaire.

Sun Boy still keeps up with the Legion at home…


Bouncing Boy was at the door. No joke, he was there to take back the porta-screen, because it was Legion property. Diiicks.

After being attacked by some bad guys who want revenge on Sun Boy arresting them in the past, he comes up with a “good” idea…


He saves the day, but the other teammates don’t understand how his plan worked…


You have to love Cosmic Boy’s aggressive attitude. “Explain THAT!” Chill out, dude!

The explanation is pure Silver Age goofiness…



Ah, the Silver Age. Do note that Siegel did, in fact, leave clues – extremely vague clues, but clues nonetheless – so it had some basis in logic. So it beat Identity Crisis, at least, in terms of playing fair with the readers, mystery-wise.