Everybody’s Somebody’s Baby – Day Two

by  in Comic News Comment
Everybody’s Somebody’s Baby – Day Two

Okay, so we had the Top 100 Marvel and DC Characters List. I even went a little further, and showed you the NEXT hundred on the list. But what about those characters that were less supported? THEY have their fans, too, right? So this week, each day I’m going to take a look at some characters who made only ONE ballot – but were chosen FIRST on that ballot.


Crimson Fox – 10 points (1 first place vote)

Vivian and Constance D’Aramis were sisters who came up with the clever plan of BOTH being a superhero, the Crimson Fox, so that the other sister could run the family’s business. They would take turns being the superhero.

The Foxes joined Justice League Europe, becoming (as a Paris-based hero) the first actual European hero on the team (not counting Rocket Red as European).

The sisters each independently developed romantic feelings for their teammate, Metamorpho.

Vivian was tragically killed in battle.

Even MORE tragically, Constance joined her soon after, in the pages of Starman.

The Crimson Fox was also involved in two, count ’em, TWO Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed! First, regarding the motives behind her death in Starman, and second, regarding how DC was persuaded to change her name because of the similarity to the character, Red Fox.

More recently, a NEW Crimson Fox has appeared.

Here is why an Anonymous poster picked Crimson Fox #1 on his list…

I guess the reason I like the Foxes the best is that they’re of the exact kind of character who could only exist in comics. French twins who fake their own deaths on a regular basis and don a brown catsuit and hood (replete with head-whip) to save Paris from super-criminals, all the while running their own multi-billion dollar corporation and having constant torrid affairs with other heroes–what’s not to love?

But I think the story that really sold me on them was the “Deconstructo” arc in JLE, when the team went up against a nihilist artist who wanted to turn the world into the chaotic, absurdist world he thought it really was. It wasn’t a very good story itself, as I recall–but then, few of the JLE ones were–but I remember that the writer specifically positioned the Fox as the villain’s ideological opposite. She was sick of her home nation’s presently cynical atmosphere and wanted to embody the true joie de vivre of its history. She wanted the spark of spirit back in Paris, and she felt like she was just the one to bring it.

I think Geoff Johns understood that when he reintroduced the Fox last year in Green Lantern. There, she announces that she is the “Passion of France,” (or “Passion of Paris,” I can’t remember which), and I think that is a perfect summation of what she stands for. She’s full of liberty and fun and sensuality. And she’s also ridiculous, and overburdened with a ludicrous backstory, but then that’s half the fun.

That’s really it.

Thanks, Anonymous!!