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Convergence: Booster Gold #2

by  in Comic Reviews Comment
Convergence: Booster Gold #2

Writer Dan Jurgens and artist Alvaro Martinez give readers a time-travel-powered tale that brings in two Booster Golds, Goldstar, Ted Kord and Rip Hunter. Superboy and a version of the Legion of Super-Heroes appear to add some external conflict, but the crux of this issue balances the two Boosters and their impact on the DC Universe.

Jurgens name-checks a whole bunch of the DC Universe but essentially delivers a “This is Your Life” story for Booster Gold that includes a conversation with Ted Kord (reuniting the fan-favorite Blue and Gold duo), a discussion of Vanishing Point and an explanation of Booster’s Legion flight ring. Jurgens appears to offer readers a conclusion to his journey as Booster’s creator and even points one of the Boosters towards a new destiny, except Jurgens leaves plenty for readers to look forward to.

As the creator of Booster Gold, Jurgens knows the character best. The modern master tries to justify all aspects of Booster Gold’s experience — hence the two Boosters — and even pays service to the fans of Blue and Gold. Jurgens’ interpretation of that duo isn’t as comical as the blending conceived by Keith Giffen and J. M. DeMatteis, but it does have a replica of the heart that makes the characters such dedicated friends.

Unfortunately for Martinez, this is a rather passive issue. Yes, there are moments for the artist to cut loose, such as Waverider’s moments in motion or the appearance of Superboy and the Legion but, for the most part, “Convergence: Booster Gold” #2 is filled with talking heads debating the merits of action and the actions of merit. Smartly inked by Raul Fernandez (who has ample opportunity to celebrate shadows with the trials facing one of the Boosters), Alvarez provides a range of emotions, camera angles and body language. There are subtleties between the two Boosters as well as the people around them. Alvarez injects personality into most of the characters and constructs plenty of detail in the world surrounding those characters. Chris Sotomayor does a solid job with the color work but could have added some more visual nuance to distinguish the two Boosters. He does a nice job with the cast of the book and ensures everyone pops from the backgrounds of every panel. Letterer Cory Breen misfires on a couple word balloons, one misdirecting a tail towards Ted Kord where Booster Gold addresses Ted by name and then conjoining a conversation between the two characters. Other than those two bobbles, Breen is sharp, as the story dictates, especially when you have two versions of a character conversing with one another.

The impact of this issue on the larger “Convergence” tale seems to be less dynamic than the implied impact of Booster Gold’s destiny on the DC Universe at large, at least as Waverider puts it in front of Booster Gold. That impact is lessened, or delayed, as Booster Gold does not appear to have an impactful role in the post-“Convergence” DC Universe. At least, not yet.