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Comics A.M. | The comics Internet in two minutes

by  in Comic News Comment
Comics A.M. | The comics Internet in two minutes

Legal | The blogosphere begins to react to Christopher Handley’s guilty plea yesterday to possessing manga that contained “obscene visual representations of the sexual abuse of children,” and mailing obscene material. Brigid Alverson and Dirk Deppey focus on the potential reach of the case.

“Do you own a copy of Alan Moore and Melinda Gebbie’s Lost Girls, by any chance?” Deppey writes. “Phoebe Gloeckner’s A Child’s Life and Other Stories? How about the infamous R. Crumb story ‘Joe Blow’? All of these comics feature characters under eighteen years of age in sexually explicit situations.”

Neil Gaiman, Gia Manry and Jyuichi also have some thoughts on the news. Expect much more reaction over the next few days.

Legal | Robin Rix looks at the legalities of a Toronto company refusing to print Adam Bourret’s autobiographical graphic novel I’m Crazy not because of its gay themes but because its sex scenes might make religious employees and clients uncomfortable. [Torontoist]

Comic strips | Editor and scholar Jeet Heer discusses Little Orphan Annie, characterizing Harold Gray as one of the overlooked founders of the American conservative movement: “By 1932, the villains in the strip are increasingly identified with the political left: snide bohemian intellectuals who mock traditional values, upper-crust class traitors who give money to communists, officious bureaucrats who hamper big business, corrupt labour union leaders who sabotage industry, demagogic politicians who stir up class envy in order to win elections, and busybody social workers who won’t let a poor orphan girl work for a living because of their silly child labor laws. Gray started to identify liberalism with elitism, a potent bit of political framing which continues to shape political discourse in American today.” [Inside Higher Ed]

Creators | Mark Medley profiles A Drifting Life creator Yoshihiro Tatsumi. [National Post]

Creators | Taiwanese cartoonist Chu Teh-yung is all the rage in mainland China. He’s so popular that the city of Hangzhou plans to build a $38 million museum dedicated to his work. [The Associated Press]

Creators | Artist Chris Sprouse talks about breaking into the industry, his process, and working with Alan Moore. [The Sardinian Connection, via Journalista]

Creators | Jeffery Klaehn chats with writer Matthew K. Manning. [Pop]

Manga | I really like this post by David Brothers about the character Atom in Naoki Urasawa’s Pluto: Urasawa x Tezuka. [4thletter!]

Comics | Tucker Stone looks at the concept of comic-book resurrections as represented by Marvel’s Captain America and DC’s Batman: Battle for the Cowl crossover: “One of these comics read like it knew what it was doing. The other one read like it was thrown together by a pack of hyenas being screamed at in a foreign language.” [Comixology]

Pop culture | You can buy adhesive bandages that sport comic book-style sound effects. Y’know, if you like that sort of thing. [InventorSpot]

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