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A Month of Writing Stars – Dave Gibbons

by  in Comic News Comment

Every day this month I’m going to feature a current comic book writing “star,” someone who I think is a very good writer.

I’m mostly going to try to keep from the biggest names as much as possible, because, really, do I need to talk more about the awesomeness of Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman and Warren Ellis?

Here is the archive of previously featured writers.

Today we look at a famous artist not so well known for his writing!

Enjoy!

Gibbons broke into comics not just drawing, but doing some writing, as well. In fact, in the very first issue of 2000 A.D., Gibbons writes and draws at least one story.

But more or less, Gibbons became known as an artist, primarily, and that is what he was brought over to the United States by DC to do – draw.

After working with Alan Moore on a few projects, most notably a little project called Watchmen, Gibbons’ great creativity as a writer was ALSO given notice by DC Comics, with an acclaimed three-issue mini-series starring Batman and Superman, with great art by Steve Rude.


Soon, Gibbons was hired to do the (at the time, rather notable) crossover between Batman and Predator.


The triumph of Gibbons’ work is his brilliant storytelling work, as he weaves plot and characterization particularly well, due in part either to his background as a great artist or his history with the great writer, Alan Moore.

In either event, a Gibbons story, no matter if it is a story of Batman fighting the Predator, is often quite dense with an engaging plot and interesting characters.

That was the case for his (too short!) run on Captain America.


His best work as a writer is easily his original graphic novel for Vertigo, The Originals, which uses the future to basically just tell a story of mods and punks. It is extremely well-crafted.


When working in the midst of an editorial mandate, Gibbons’ skills are a bit less useful, but he still managed to do a strong run on Green Lantern Corps (Geoff Johns often co-wrote).


The best issues were the ones that stood apart from any crossover.

I’d love to see some new written work from Gibbons (heck, I’d love new art work from him, too!).