31 Days of Comics – Comic That Deserves a Soundtrack

by  in Comic News Comment
31 Days of Comics – Comic That Deserves a Soundtrack

Our pal Seth Hahne, of GoodOKBad fame, came up with this 31 Days of Comics challenge, one of those things where each day of the month you’re given a different category that you then make a choice of a comic to fill that category. I figured it would be a fun bit to do, so here we are! Click here to see each of the categories so far!

We continue with Day 18, which is a Comic That Deserves a Soundtrack.

Read on for my pick and then you can share yours!

This is a bit of a tough category (and I like that even Seth admitted as much). My #1 guess would be the Scott Pilgrim books, but since they had a movie with an actual soundtrack that seems like a bit of a cheat.

So I will go with Cyril Pedrosa’s graphic novel, Three Shadows.

This story, translated from the French by First Second Books, tells the tale of a young married couple named Louis and Lise and their son Joachim. They live on a farm in the countryside and everything is just nice and fun and simple until, well, one day things changed…for the worse.

Let’s see how Pedrosa handles the reveal (brilliantly, I might add)…

How spooky is that? Pedrosa really nails that scene beautifully.

Now couldn’t you imagine those sequences really doing well with a great soundtrack? The happy times would be highlighted even more and the ominous reveal of the shadows would be even more striking.

In any event, the three shadows are here for Joachim. Effectively, his life is over. But if you’re his parents, how can you accept something so absurd as “oh, okay, three shadows are here to end our son’s life, oh well, what are you going to do?”

That’s what this book is really about – showing how Louis and Lise are driven to extremes (particularly Louis) in protecting their son. And in the process of protecting him, are they losing each other?

This is a powerful work with striking, dynamic artwork. And again, I could imagine the use of music really elevating the experience. Sort of like The Night of the Hunter, that classic Robert Mitchum film, which used music so well to elevate the experience of dread.